Mimicry ambivalence and hybridity

On the other hand, Bhabha does not interpret mimicry as a narcissistic identification of the colonizer in which the colonized stops being a person without the colonizer present in his identity.

homi k bhabha the location of culture text pdf

To demonstrate this anxiety, Bhabha looks back to the histories of colonialism. The Dialogic Imagination.

Mimicry ambivalence and hybridity

Furthermore, mimicry is the sign of the inappropriate, "a difference or recalcitrance which coheres the dominant strategic function of colonial power, intensifies surveillance, and poses an imminent threat to both 'normalized' knowledges and disciplinary powers". They mark the disturbance of its authoritative representations by the uncanny forces of race, sexuality, violence, cultural and even climatic differences which emerge in the colonial discourse as the mixed and split texts of hybridity. Asserting such myths was a very important part of the imperial process and therefore an important feature of much imperial writing and indeed postcolonial writing. Adapted into colonial discourse theory by Homi K Bhabha , it describes the complex mix of attraction and repulsion that characterizes the relationship between colonizer and colonized. But this is not a simple reversal of a binary, for Bhabha shows that both colonizing and colonized subjects are implicated in the ambivalence of colonial discourse. In other words, Bhabha argues that cultural identities cannot be ascribed to pre-given,irreducible, scripted, ahistorical cultural traits that define the conventions of ethnicity. Soja has most thoroughly relied on and transformed Bhabha's approaches to understanding notion of space, action, and representation.

More recently we have become aware of how problematic such accounts are. Enunciation implies that culture has no fixity and even the same signs can be appropriated, translated, rehistoricized, and read anew.

Hybridity in postcolonialism ppt

This is controversial because it implies that the colonial relationship is going to be disrupted, regardless of any resistance or rebellion on the part of the colonized. They mark the disturbance of its authoritative representations by the uncanny forces of race, sexuality, violence, cultural and even climatic differnces which emerge in the colonial discource as the mixed and split texts of hybridity. Cultural difference, enunciation, and stereotype[ edit ] Bhabha presents cultural difference as an alternative to cultural diversity. Ranger, T. In these theories, a ritual, especially a rite of passage involves some change to the participants, especially theirsocial status. It is, literally, the quality of the second stage of a ritual in the theories ofArnold van Gennep[1], Victor Turner[2], and others. In cultural diversity, a culture is an "object of empirical knowledge" and pre-exists the knower while cultural difference sees culture as the point at which two or more cultures meet and it is also where most problems occur, discursively constructed rather than pre-given, a "process of enunciation of culture as 'knowledgeable. Homi Bhabha is the leading contemporary critic who has tried to disclose the contradictions inherent in colonial discourse in order to highlight the colonizer's ambivalence in respect to his position toward the colonized Other. Colonial signifiers of authority only acquire their meanings after the "traumatic scenario of colonial difference, cultural or racial, returns the eye of power to some prior archaic image or identity. Enunciation implies that culture has no fixity and even the same signs can be appropriated, translated, rehistoricized, and read anew. The simple presence of the colonized Other within the textual structure is enough evidence of the ambivalence of the colonial text, an ambivalence that destabilizes its claim for absolute authority or unquestionable authenticity.

The representation of difference must not be hastily read as the reflection of pre-given ethnic or cultural traits set in the fixed tablet of tradition.

Contemporary Postcolonial Theory. Nevertheless, some postcolonial critics argue that it is precisely this kind of mimicry that disrupts the colonial discourse by doubling it.

mimicry in postcolonialism slideshare

London: Heinemann, Homi Bhabha explains the history of hybridity as history of culture and its major theoretical discussion amongst the discourses of race, post-colonialism, identity social sciencesanti-racism and multiculturalism, and globalization his discussion traverses the development of hybridity rhetoric from biological to cultural illustrations in literature.

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Mimicry, Ambivalence and Hybridity